Which dog do would make a better pet?

A samoyed or a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel? I honestly love both but can’t decide. Cavaliers have health problems and cost a fortune but make for beautiful Cute Pets that love there owners. Samoyeds shed like crazy and tend to bark a lot which can be a good or bad thing but they are truly beautiful dogs that are amongst the most loyal. I am totaly torn.

heres info on the CKCS:Family: spaniel, companion
Area of Origin: England
Date of Origin: 1600s
Original Function: flushing small birds, lapdog
Today’s Function: companion
Avg Size of male: Height: 12-13 Weight: 13-18
Avg Size of Female: Height: 12-13 Weight: 13-18
Other Name: none

History
As its name implies, the cavalier King Charles spaniel is derived from spaniel roots. The European toy dogs were probably the result of breeding small spaniels to Oriental toy breeds such as the Japanese Chin and perhaps the Tibetan spaniel. These Tudor lap dogs, known as "comforter spaniels," served as lap and foot warmers, and even surrogate hot-water bottles. In addition, they served the vital function of attracting fleas from their owners’ bodies! The toy spaniels became especially popular because they appealed to all members of the family. In the 1700s, King Charles II was so enamored with his toy spaniels that he was accused of ignoring matters of state in favor of his dogs. The dogs were so closely associated with him that they became known as King Charles spaniels. After his death, the Duke of Marlborough took over as the major advocate of the breed; the red and white "Blenheim" color, which was his favorite, is named after his estate. The King Charles spaniel continued to grace the homes of the wealthy for generations, but with time a shorter-nosed dog was preferred. By the early 1900s, the few dogs that resembled the early members of the breed were considered to be inferior. A twist of fate occurred when a wealthy American, Roswell Eldridge, came to England and offered outlandish prize money for the best "pointed-nosed" spaniels — those most resembling the old type. Breeders bred their old-type dogs together in an effort to gain the prize, and in so doing, many came to appreciate the old type. Ironically, these dogs, named cavalier King Charles spaniels in honor of the "cavalier king," eventually outstripped their short-nosed counterparts in popularity, becoming one of the most popular breeds in England. They were slower to catch on in America, and many cavalier owners fought AKC recognition in an effort to control the problems that so often accompany popularity. In 1996, the AKC recognized the cavalier; it is too early to tell whether its popularity

Temperament
The cavalier in many ways fits the bill as an ideal house pet. It is sweet, gentle, playful, willing to please, affectionate and quiet. It is amiable toward other dogs, pets and strangers. Outdoors, its spaniel heritage kicks in, and it loves to explore, sniff and chase.

Upkeep
The cavalier needs a fair amount of exercise every day, either in the form of a moderate walk on leash or a romp in a safe area. This is not a breed that should live outdoors. Its long coat needs brushing every other day.

Health
• Major concerns: MVI, CHD
• Minor concerns: patellar luxation, entropion
• Occasionally seen: retinal dysplasia
• Suggested tests: cardiac, hip, knee, eye
• Life span: 9 – 14 years
• Note: Cavaliers should not be bred until the age of 5 years, and only after being checked
at that age for MVD.
And samoyed:
Family: spitz, Northern (herding)
Area of Origin: Russia (Siberia)
Date of Origin: ancient times
Original Function: herding reindeer, guardian, draft
Today’s Function: sled pulling, herding trials
Avg Size of male: Height: 21-23.5 Weight: 45-65
Avg Size of Female: Height: 19-21 Weight: 35-50
Other Name: Samoyedskaya

History
The nomadic Samoyed people, for whom the Samoyed dog is named, came to northwestern Siberia from central Asia. They depended upon herds of reindeer for food and had to keep on the move so that the reindeer could find sufficient food for themselves. They also depended upon strong hardy spitz dogs to herd the reindeer and to guard them against the fierce predators of the Arctic. They occasionally helped to hunt bears and tow boats and sledges. These dogs lived as part of the family in the hide tents of their people, where one of their "jobs" was to keep the children warm in bed. The first Samoyeds came to England in the late 1800s, but not all these early imports were the pure white the breed is known for today. One of these dogs was presented to Queen Alexandria, who did much to promote the breed. Descendants of the queen’s dogs can still be found in modern pedigrees. In 1906, the first Samoyed came to America, originally a gift of Russia’s Grand Duke Nicholas. Meanwhile, the breed was becoming a popular sled dog because it was more tractable than other sledding breeds. In the early 1900s, Samoyeds formed part of the sled teams on expeditions to Antarctica and shared in the triumph of reaching the South Pole. The breed’s exploits, combined with its glistening good looks, soon won the public’s attention in America, and its popularity has grown tremendously since the Second World War. Although the once nomadic Samoyed people have long since settled in one place, the breed they created has journeyed around the world.

Temperament
Gentle and playful, the Samoyed makes a good companion for a child or person of any age. It is a closely bonded family dog. It is amiable with strangers, other pets and usually, other dogs. It is calm indoors, but this clever, sometimes mischievous breed needs daily physical and mental exercise. If allowed to become bored, it will dig and bark. It is independent and often stubborn, but it is willing to please and is responsive to its owner’s wishes. It may tend to herd children.

Upkeep
The Samoyed is active and needs a good workout every day, either in the form of a long walk or jog or a vigorous play session. It likes to pull and herd, and it loves cold weather. It can live outdoors in temperate to cold climates, but it much prefers to live indoors with its human family. Its thick coat needs brushing and combing two to three times a week, daily when shedding.

Health
• Major concerns: CHD
• Minor concerns: gastric torsion
• Occasionally seen: PRA
• Suggested tests: hip, (eye)
• Life span: 10 – 12 years

Form and Function
The Samoyed combines strength, agility, dignity and grace in a general spitz outline. Slightly longer than it is tall, it is nonetheless compact. It has a strong, muscular body that is able to combine power, speed, agility and endurance. It has a quick, agile stride with good reach and drive. Its double coat is heavy and weather resistant. The undercoat is soft and thick, whereas the outer coat is straight and harsh, standing straight out from the body, and glistening with a silver sheen. Its expression is animated, with the characteristic "Samoyed smile" created by the upturned corners of its mouth.
If you have allergies get the CKCS but if you dont want to be worrying a bout your dog than get the Samoyed.

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4 Responses to Which dog do would make a better pet?

  1. Steph says:

    well you could do research on each or you could coose a different breed. if i were you, i would take this quiz on dog breeds. it tells you which dog breed is fit for your life style and its fun and easy! please try it!

    http://animal.discovery.com/breedselector/dogselectorindex.do
    References :

  2. sopi girl says:

    u could try to find a mix for sale… if u dont want to do that then u should get a samoyed and just take it to puppy school at petco or petsmart
    References :

  3. Wolf Spirit says:

    heres info on the CKCS:Family: spaniel, companion
    Area of Origin: England
    Date of Origin: 1600s
    Original Function: flushing small birds, lapdog
    Today’s Function: companion
    Avg Size of male: Height: 12-13 Weight: 13-18
    Avg Size of Female: Height: 12-13 Weight: 13-18
    Other Name: none

    History
    As its name implies, the cavalier King Charles spaniel is derived from spaniel roots. The European toy dogs were probably the result of breeding small spaniels to Oriental toy breeds such as the Japanese Chin and perhaps the Tibetan spaniel. These Tudor lap dogs, known as "comforter spaniels," served as lap and foot warmers, and even surrogate hot-water bottles. In addition, they served the vital function of attracting fleas from their owners’ bodies! The toy spaniels became especially popular because they appealed to all members of the family. In the 1700s, King Charles II was so enamored with his toy spaniels that he was accused of ignoring matters of state in favor of his dogs. The dogs were so closely associated with him that they became known as King Charles spaniels. After his death, the Duke of Marlborough took over as the major advocate of the breed; the red and white "Blenheim" color, which was his favorite, is named after his estate. The King Charles spaniel continued to grace the homes of the wealthy for generations, but with time a shorter-nosed dog was preferred. By the early 1900s, the few dogs that resembled the early members of the breed were considered to be inferior. A twist of fate occurred when a wealthy American, Roswell Eldridge, came to England and offered outlandish prize money for the best "pointed-nosed" spaniels — those most resembling the old type. Breeders bred their old-type dogs together in an effort to gain the prize, and in so doing, many came to appreciate the old type. Ironically, these dogs, named cavalier King Charles spaniels in honor of the "cavalier king," eventually outstripped their short-nosed counterparts in popularity, becoming one of the most popular breeds in England. They were slower to catch on in America, and many cavalier owners fought AKC recognition in an effort to control the problems that so often accompany popularity. In 1996, the AKC recognized the cavalier; it is too early to tell whether its popularity

    Temperament
    The cavalier in many ways fits the bill as an ideal house pet. It is sweet, gentle, playful, willing to please, affectionate and quiet. It is amiable toward other dogs, pets and strangers. Outdoors, its spaniel heritage kicks in, and it loves to explore, sniff and chase.

    Upkeep
    The cavalier needs a fair amount of exercise every day, either in the form of a moderate walk on leash or a romp in a safe area. This is not a breed that should live outdoors. Its long coat needs brushing every other day.

    Health
    • Major concerns: MVI, CHD
    • Minor concerns: patellar luxation, entropion
    • Occasionally seen: retinal dysplasia
    • Suggested tests: cardiac, hip, knee, eye
    • Life span: 9 – 14 years
    • Note: Cavaliers should not be bred until the age of 5 years, and only after being checked
    at that age for MVD.
    And samoyed:
    Family: spitz, Northern (herding)
    Area of Origin: Russia (Siberia)
    Date of Origin: ancient times
    Original Function: herding reindeer, guardian, draft
    Today’s Function: sled pulling, herding trials
    Avg Size of male: Height: 21-23.5 Weight: 45-65
    Avg Size of Female: Height: 19-21 Weight: 35-50
    Other Name: Samoyedskaya

    History
    The nomadic Samoyed people, for whom the Samoyed dog is named, came to northwestern Siberia from central Asia. They depended upon herds of reindeer for food and had to keep on the move so that the reindeer could find sufficient food for themselves. They also depended upon strong hardy spitz dogs to herd the reindeer and to guard them against the fierce predators of the Arctic. They occasionally helped to hunt bears and tow boats and sledges. These dogs lived as part of the family in the hide tents of their people, where one of their "jobs" was to keep the children warm in bed. The first Samoyeds came to England in the late 1800s, but not all these early imports were the pure white the breed is known for today. One of these dogs was presented to Queen Alexandria, who did much to promote the breed. Descendants of the queen’s dogs can still be found in modern pedigrees. In 1906, the first Samoyed came to America, originally a gift of Russia’s Grand Duke Nicholas. Meanwhile, the breed was becoming a popular sled dog because it was more tractable than other sledding breeds. In the early 1900s, Samoyeds formed part of the sled teams on expeditions to Antarctica and shared in the triumph of reaching the South Pole. The breed’s exploits, combined with its glistening good looks, soon won the public’s attention in America, and its popularity has grown tremendously since the Second World War. Although the once nomadic Samoyed people have long since settled in one place, the breed they created has journeyed around the world.

    Temperament
    Gentle and playful, the Samoyed makes a good companion for a child or person of any age. It is a closely bonded family dog. It is amiable with strangers, other pets and usually, other dogs. It is calm indoors, but this clever, sometimes mischievous breed needs daily physical and mental exercise. If allowed to become bored, it will dig and bark. It is independent and often stubborn, but it is willing to please and is responsive to its owner’s wishes. It may tend to herd children.

    Upkeep
    The Samoyed is active and needs a good workout every day, either in the form of a long walk or jog or a vigorous play session. It likes to pull and herd, and it loves cold weather. It can live outdoors in temperate to cold climates, but it much prefers to live indoors with its human family. Its thick coat needs brushing and combing two to three times a week, daily when shedding.

    Health
    • Major concerns: CHD
    • Minor concerns: gastric torsion
    • Occasionally seen: PRA
    • Suggested tests: hip, (eye)
    • Life span: 10 – 12 years

    Form and Function
    The Samoyed combines strength, agility, dignity and grace in a general spitz outline. Slightly longer than it is tall, it is nonetheless compact. It has a strong, muscular body that is able to combine power, speed, agility and endurance. It has a quick, agile stride with good reach and drive. Its double coat is heavy and weather resistant. The undercoat is soft and thick, whereas the outer coat is straight and harsh, standing straight out from the body, and glistening with a silver sheen. Its expression is animated, with the characteristic "Samoyed smile" created by the upturned corners of its mouth.
    If you have allergies get the CKCS but if you dont want to be worrying a bout your dog than get the Samoyed.
    References :
    AnimalDiscovery.com/dogbreeds

  4. Shari says:

    get both! why not???
    References :

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